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Ramblings on RACI Matrix for Projects September 25, 2014

Posted by Edwin Ritter in Project Management.
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4 comments

A lot of things need to occur to get a project started. For the project manager, understanding the basics about the project – the goal, timing, budget are some of the tasks to getting organized. Included in that understanding is who will do what tasks for the project.

A great way to get organized and develop that overall understanding about the make up of a project is to document. No, really, it is. There are several basic documents that come to mind. As separate and distinct files, those include the scope, charter, schedule and raci matrix. Each of these is important for upfront planning and also during execution of the project. I have found that writing or contributing to each of these is very helpful. Being able to communicate the knowledge of  the what, how and who during a project kick-off meeting helps get the team up to speed quickly. Most of the documents are easy to understand conceptually by their title. The last one, the responsibility matrix thing, might be a bit unclear.

Six-Sigma-RACI-MatrixEssentially, the raci matrix lists who is responsible for what on a project. As an acronym, it stands for Responsible, Accountable, Consulted and Informed. A brief definition of each will assist in why this document is useful for the project manager, the team and stakeholders.

Responsible – Those who do the work to achieve a task. There is typically one role with a participation type of Responsible.

Accountable – Those who are ultimately accountable for the correct and thorough completion of the deliverable or task, and the one to whom Responsible is accountable. Typically, the Process Owner is Accountable for a process, and there must be only one Accountable specified for each task or deliverable.

Consulted – Those who are not directly involved in a process but provide inputs and whose opinions are sought.

Informed – Those who receive outputs from a process or are kept up-to-date on progress, often only on completion of the task or deliverable.

There is a variation that includes another role for support. There are templates available for a RASCI as well. The ‘s’ stands for support and the definition is :

Support – Resources allocated to Responsible. Unlike Consulted, who may provide input to the task, Support will assist in completing the task.

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The RACI matrix is not only used in project management. It is used in other IT processes and methodologies. The RACI matrix is part of the ITIL process for service design and driving service improvement. For Six Sigma methodology, the RACI matrix reflects the basic principles of the process.

Having a RACI helps everyone understand the specific interactions and dependencies involved with the who and what on a project. The RACI matrix is useful for communicating across the organization when a project needs support. This can be very useful in matrixed organizations and reduce the overall time required to get resources.

RACI MatrixAn example of a RACI Matrix will help show the value. Here is a sample matrix that will use SharePoint. From this visual,  you can quickly determine who does what.

On this sample, you can see the project manager is accountable for almost everything. Additionally, you can see what each person on the team owns and will drive to completion. A subtle point here in that it also indicates what tasks each person should plan, be involved with for, or otherwise be aware of. From my experience, it also visually emphasizes teamwork and that a team effort is required to deliver the project. Note – the astute among you will notice that the example matrixes shown in this post are transposed. However they are oriented, the concept remains the same.

Comments invited on this tool in project management, ITIL or Six Sigma.

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Impact of Project Communications February 25, 2014

Posted by Edwin Ritter in Project Management.
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1 comment so far

One of the most important skills I find in project management is being able to communicate. It may sound simple and a bit obvious and yet can be a hard lesson learned for project managers.  My experience has shown that having the ability to hear and,  just as important, be heard, can make or break a project. The format and style used in those communications can be formal or informal, relative to the culture and management style of the organization. Regardless, that ability to indicate progress or raise issues quickly and get feedback keeps a project on track and moving forward.

Feedback-LoopIn fact, I prefer having a closed loop in communicating. I have found that the feedback loop is key to keeping everyone on the same page about a project. This works not only during execution but also for change management. Without feedback, you may not meet the needs of the client and/or stakeholders. That is a waste of both time and money for them and you. That can easily be avoided working in a closed loop with feedback.

The Project Management Institute lists 5 skills each project manager should have to be successful. The list includes the following traits:

  1. Listen to both what is said and what is not said.
  2. Build relationships with everyone involved in the project and across, up and down the organization.
  3. Set clear priorities with the team and obtain that list from the stakeholders.
  4. Collaborate with everyone as none of us is as smart as all of us.
  5. Convey the mission and project impact to it.

I agree with this list and also expect that stakeholders have similar skills. Their ability to listen and provide clear direction is a key success factor on every project.

Without feedback, how would you know you when you successfully deliver a project?