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This is why big data is the sweet spot for SaaS May 15, 2013

Posted by Edwin Ritter in Cloud Computing, Trends.
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Big data sweet spot is in software as service (SaaS).

Gigaom

People often ask me where the smart money is in big data. I often tell them that’s a foolish question, because I’m not an investor — but if I were, I’d look to software as a service.

There are two primary reasons why, the first of which is obvious: Companies are tired of managing applications and infrastructure, so something that optimizes a common task using techniques they don’t know on servers they don’t have to manage is probably compelling. It’s called cloud computing.

The other reason is that the big part of big data really is important if you want to get a really clear picture of what’s happening in any given space. While no single end-user company can (or likely would) address search-engine optimization, for example, by building a massive store comprised of data from hundreds or thousands of companies as well as the entire web, a cloud service…

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Ruminations on blog metrics June 16, 2012

Posted by Edwin Ritter in Miscellaneous, Trends.
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The old saw about what gets measured gets managed comes to mind when I think about blog metrics. When you collect and analyze measurements, that is part of the management. You watch for changes; learn what works and repeat those. You also learn what does not work and avoid repeating those.

So it was interesting to me watching the traffic for this blog grow over the past few months. I was measuring and managing very well for quite a while. Then, the floor on the blog traffic measures fell out. My blog posts stopped for a time. While I was measuring, I was not managing. Perhaps I had a few too many spinning plates and some fell and broke. I was managing other things but not the blog and there was a definite impact on traffic.

I also managed comments to this blog. Some real genuine comments submitted, many other comments that are just spam. The spammers are amusing in that they repeat themselves. Or, better yet, they repeat each other. Verbatim. So I manage the spam by deleting it. The positive comments are accepted and shown.  Thank You to all who take the time to submit those.

Since this blog started, I have been measuring using the metrics provided by WordPress. I also use tools from Google Webmaster and  Bing webmaster  (which looks quite different these days) to measure and then manage. From these tools and managing the comments, I learn what works and watch the traffic.

Perhaps this post will bring traffic back to more recent levels. I’ll be measuring and then manage from there.

What blog metrics do you measure? How does that drive how you manage your blog? Comments invited and I will share the good ones. 😉

10 ways big data changes everything May 9, 2012

Posted by Edwin Ritter in Cloud Computing, E-Commerce, SEO, Trends.
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As 2012 reaches the half way mark, here is a post on one of this years’ hot topics. This is the first of three.

What is big data? How big is big? Think Yottabytes. So much data is now collected that 90% of the online data was created in just the last two years. Simply stated, everything you do on the web is tracked and creates data. It is then stored, sliced, diced and analyzed. The growth in data is due to proliferation of smart phones and tablets, lower storage costs and improved analytical tools. This article reveals 10 ways in which big data will have an impact.

Gigaom

A yottabyte isn’t what happens when the Jedi master starts gnawing on your leg. It’s the information equivalent of one quadrillion gigabytes, and is enough digital data to fill the states of Delaware and Rhode Island with a million data centers, according to Backblaze. While the world hasn’t yet seen many yottabytes, industries like Internet search, genomics, climate research, and business analytics are starting to create massive data sets — in the peta- and exabyte range — that are requiring an entirely new set of big data tools to manage.

The emergence of this so-called big data phenomenon is also fundamentally changing everything from the way companies operate, to the way people interact, to how the world deals with outbreaks of infectious diseases. On March 21st and 22nd, GigaOM is throwing an event about the future of this big data ecosystem in New York, Structure:Data, and for…

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Ruminations on 5 New Management metrics December 14, 2011

Posted by Edwin Ritter in career, Project Management.
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I saw this article today on Forbes.com about new ways to manage. I agree with each and have used several of these metrics with success. To read the full article, use the link provided. My comments on each metric are included below. While it is a catchy title, I don’t think managers need to know these to be successful. You can adapt one or more for your own use easily and look for ways to subtly employ each of the strategies described. These metrics won’t drastically change management styles, but they do provide ways to improve your management ability and help drive your team to be successful.

Metric 1: Flow State Percentage

Basically indicates that people need more think/soak time. When you have time to concentrate (i.e. – no interruptions), you are more productive. Getting to, and staying in, the zone more often makes you a better performer.

Metric 2: The Anxiety-Boredom Continuum

Keep a balance here. Not too easy, not too hard. Stay engaged and tune the level needed as it suites your team.

Metric 3: Meeting Promoter Score

I have used this to great effect. If you rate the meetings, you get instant feedback on what works, what does not and what people are really interested in. I found that once you have a consistent score, you don’t need to track it and your team knows what to expect and is engaged. Bonus – if you end meetings early, expect your score to increase.

Metric 4: Compound Weekly Learning Rate

My Father-in-Law, who came from the old country, always said “Every day you learn.” You do if you are motivated to do so. Even if you just did this for yourself, measuring your progress would change your priorities and how you spend your time in the office.

Metric 5: Positive Feedback Ratio

Catch your team doing things right. Even the mundane tasks. The author mentions the payback is realized that when you have legitimate criticism, your reports will listen.

These strategies are easy to implement. You can try one or more with your team and tune them as needed. With the new year just around the corner, now is a great time to look at ways to improve your management skills. Who knows – you may influence your peers and your boss by doing this.

Good luck and let me know what your metrics look like over time.