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No, a legal notice won’t protect you from Facebook — so stop posting them November 27, 2012

Posted by Edwin Ritter in Trends.
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The idea is very tempting that you can dictate the terms. But, it is not true and not even practical. Read the details after the jump.

Gigaom

Here we go again — Facebook users want to ward off Mark Zuckerberg and his friends by posting random legal mumbo jumbo on their profile. This is ridiculous. Stop it.

In case you missed it, an old hoax has resurfaced that suggests Facebook (s fb) users can tell the company what to do by publishing a rambling notice. This means that people’s Facebook feeds are once again being sprayed by items like this one:

It’s a nice idea that stems from a growing frustration at the power companies like Facebook have over our personal information. The desire for user empowerment is understandable. But it doesn’t change the fact that you sign a contract with Facebook when you sign up to use its service. It’s the same with Google(s goog), Apple(s aapl), Pinterest and many other sites.

These contracts let the companies do what they want with your data subject to…

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Ramblings on the Personal Cloud November 18, 2012

Posted by Edwin Ritter in Cloud Computing, Trends.
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Changing of the terms – Life in the cloud will redefine many things as we go forward. One technical term that will change is PC. We all know that PC initially was defined as personal computer. That is the accepted 1.0 definition. For the 2.0 version, it stands for personal cloud. This is the third and final post of the technology trends I am watching this year.  Previous posts covered big data and cloud computing.

The modern internet provides many cloud (or, web hosted) services that are easily  personalized to satisfy our our needs. One example is Google Docs. Storing documents in the cloud makes them accessible from multiple devices. Another cloud-based service is Dropbox. These and the multiple others like them store information in the cloud as opposed to a local or hard drive or internal network folder. Cloud services make it very easy to share information – send the URL. An added benefit is sharing the URL does not clog up your email in-box with lots of attachements. Many reliable cloud services are free and the subscription fee-based services provide additional capability.

I like life in the cloud and have had my personal cloud for some time now. The convenience of accessing a file from multiple devices is a wonderful thing. Sharing data with family and colleagues is easy and quick – simply provide the URL.

I submit that the personal cloud has a major impact for owners of tablets and smartphones. Where a home or work computer can store information locally on a hard drive, tablets and smartphones have limited storage space. Using the cloud for storage makes this a non-issue.

How is your personal cloud? Do you use these services without thinking about it? Will it change where you store/share information?